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Diurnal Rhythms in the Red Seaweed Gracilariopsis chorda are Characterized by Unique Regulatory Networks of Carbon Metabolismopen access

Authors
Lee, JunmoYang, Ji HyunWeber, Andreas P. M.Bhattacharya, DebashishKim, Woe-YeonYoon, Hwan Su
Issue Date
Feb-2024
Publisher
OXFORD UNIV PRESS
Keywords
Gracilariopsis chorda; rhythmic gene; cryptochrome; cytosolic carbon metabolism; horizontal gene transfers
Citation
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, v.41, no.2
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
Journal Title
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION
Volume
41
Number
2
URI
https://scholarworks.gnu.ac.kr/handle/sw.gnu/69729
DOI
10.1093/molbev/msae012
ISSN
0737-4038
1537-1719
Abstract
Cellular and physiological cycles are driven by endogenous pacemakers, the diurnal and circadian rhythms. Key functions such as cell cycle progression and cellular metabolism are under rhythmic regulation, thereby maintaining physiological homeostasis. The photoreceptors phytochrome and cryptochrome, in response to light cues, are central input pathways for physiological cycles in most photosynthetic organisms. However, among Archaeplastida, red algae are the only taxa that lack phytochromes. Current knowledge about oscillatory rhythms is primarily derived from model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the Viridiplantae, whereas little is known about these processes in other clades of the Archaeplastida, such as the red algae (Rhodophyta). We used genome-wide expression profiling of the red seaweed Gracilariopsis chorda and identified 3,098 rhythmic genes. Here, we characterized possible cryptochrome-based regulation and photosynthetic/cytosolic carbon metabolism in this species. We found a large family of cryptochrome genes in G. chorda that display rhythmic expression over the diurnal cycle and may compensate for the lack of phytochromes in this species. The input pathway gates regulatory networks of carbon metabolism which results in a compact and efficient energy metabolism during daylight hours. The system in G. chorda is distinct from energy metabolism in most plants, which activates in the dark. The green lineage, in particular, land plants, balance water loss and CO2 capture in terrestrial environments. In contrast, red seaweeds maintain a reduced set of photoreceptors and a compact cytosolic carbon metabolism to thrive in the harsh abiotic conditions typical of intertidal zones.
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