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Effects of Thinning Intensity on Litterfall Production, Soil Chemical Properties, and Fine Root Distribution in Pinus koraiensis Plantation in Republic of Koreaopen access

Authors
Han, Si HoAn, Ji YoungHernandez, Jonathan O.Yang, Hee MoonKim, Eun-SookNoh, Nam JinSeo, Jeong MinPark, Byung Bae
Issue Date
Oct-2023
Publisher
Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Keywords
belowground ecology; fine root biomass; fine root necromass; Korean pine; understory vegetation
Citation
Plants, v.12, no.20
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
Journal Title
Plants
Volume
12
Number
20
URI
https://scholarworks.gnu.ac.kr/handle/sw.gnu/68780
DOI
10.3390/plants12203614
ISSN
2223-7747
2223-7747
Abstract
It is crucial to evaluate the effects of thinning on litterfall production, soil chemical properties, and fine root dynamics when implementing thinning as a silvilcultural technique to enhance tree growth and timber yield in Pinus koraiensis plantations. Thus, we determined the 10-year effects (2007–2017) of different thinning intensities on litterfall production, soil chemical properties, and fine root biomass and necromass within a P. koraiensis plantation in South Korea. The soil chemical parameters and fine root biomass and necromass were also compared across three soil depths (0–10, 10–20, and 20–30 cm). Three thinning treatments were employed: no thinning (CON), light thinning (32% removed, LT), and heavy thinning (64% removed, HT). Results revealed that litterfall was consistent across all thinning treatments, but broadleaf species had considerably higher litterfall production at HT stands than at CON/LT stands. Soil chemical properties, except exchangeable K+, were generally lower at LT stands, particularly at a depth of 20–30 cm soil. After ten years, there was a decrease in fine root biomass and necromass with increasing soil depth. Over 80% of fine roots were found in the upper layer (0–20 cm), while very fine roots (0–1 mm) consisted mainly of 47% pine and 53% other species and were concentrated in the 0–10 cm soil depth in HT. In conclusion, different thinning intensities had diverse effects on the parameters measured within the plantation. Future studies can explore how the effects of thinning intensities on litterfall production, soil chemistry, and fine root dynamics affect species diversity, carbon storage, and understory vegetation in P. koraiensis plantations. © 2023 by the authors.
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