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Cited 10 time in webofscience Cited 13 time in scopus
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Growth, Quality, and Nitrogen Assimilation in Response to High Ammonium or Nitrate Supply in Cabbage (Brassica campestris L.) and Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)open access

Authors
Song, JinnanYang, JingliJeong, Byoung Ryong
Issue Date
Dec-2021
Publisher
MDPI
Keywords
nitrogen metabolism; ammonium toxicity; photosynthetic capacity; carbohydrate; nitrate reductase (NR); nitrite reductase (NIR); glutamine synthetase (GS); glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)
Citation
AGRONOMY-BASEL, v.11, no.12
Indexed
SCIE
SCOPUS
Journal Title
AGRONOMY-BASEL
Volume
11
Number
12
URI
https://scholarworks.bwise.kr/gnu/handle/sw.gnu/2925
DOI
10.3390/agronomy11122556
Abstract
Plants grow better when they are supplied with a combination of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) than when either one is supplied as the sole N (nitrogen) source. However, the effects of N forms on N metabolism and major N assimilation enzymes in different plants, especially vegetables, are largely neglected. This study was conducted on two plants with distinct NH4+ tolerances to compare the responses of two popular leafy vegetables, Korean cabbage (Brassica campestris L.) 'Ssamchu' and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) 'Caesar green', to the N source. To this end, plant growth and quality, photosynthesis, carbohydrate, N contents (in the forms of NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, total protein), and key N assimilation-related enzyme (NR, NIR, GS, GDH) activities were investigated. When plants were subjected to one of three NH4+:NO3- regimes, 0:100, 50:50, or 100:0, lettuce was relatively more tolerant while cabbage was extremely sensitive to high NH4+. Both plants benefited more from being grown with 50:50 NH4+:NO3-, as evidenced by the best growth performance, ameliorated photosynthesis, and enriched carbohydrate (C) stock content. In addition, as compared to cabbage, the GS and GDH activities were reinforced in lettuce in response to an increasing external NH4+ level, resulting in low NH4+ accumulation. Our findings suggested that boosting or maintaining high GS and GDH activities is an important strategy for the ammonium tolerance in vegetables.
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